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Corinna Fales Consulting

"Thanks to Corinna Fales for speaking directly from her own experience and heart, and for saying what I’ve often thought. Political correctness ended real political conversation in our time, but the times they are a changin’. Highly recommended, especially for the politically correct."

      

 - Casey Hayden, founder/staff, Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC); Students for a Democratic Society (SDS)

"This book is a real gift, an unusual contribution to the necessary conversation--really an upheaval--about how we, who are a 'this,' a 'that,' and 'an other' are to live with those who are not this, not that, and not the other." 


      - Todd Gitlin, Professor of Journalism & Sociology;  Chair, PhD Program in Communications, Columbia University 

“Truly fascinating and an important contribution. 

We need this message in today’s times.”

    

- Dr. Karen Wynn, Professor of Psychology and Cognitive Science at Yale University

An important book, beautifully crafted. At a time of division in our country, author Corinna Fales gives us an intimate look at how being different feels for several quite diverse people. These highly personal interviews were possible only because the author grew up with her subjects, played with them, learned with them, cried with them, and laughed with them. This is also a look at a piece of history focusing on the historically black Lincoln University as it existed in the 1940s through the 1950s and on the adjacent village. In addition to being an important book for our times, it is often moving, humorous, and insightful.

- Richard Brown (awaiting new title)


             About My New Book

Click here to buy at Lulu.com

Click here to buy at Amazon


In This book is NOT a safe space, I tell you--in a punchy, personal, funny way--why, as a lifelong activist who has promoted diversity and social justice all my life, I contend that politically correct (PC) culture undermines inclusion and hurts the people it is intended to protect.

My parents' families were murdered by the Nazis, I grew up at the first degree-granting Historically Black College/University before desegregation, visited migrant camps as a girl, went to jail for civil rights, and slept in my bathtub to avoid the National Guard's bullets when Newark exploded in 1967. In 1968, I was thrown into Cook County Jail and became an unindicted co-conspirator of the Chicago Seven. To find out why I, a still-active #MeToo woman, think that PC is treacherous and discover what I propose as a way forward, read This book is NOT a safe space: The unintended harm of political correctness

            If you like, you can watch this short YouTube video:

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCWePrAJEZtjxp7Lk2pUSOjg

 

      You can also read this article on the book that was published in     AM New York on July 24, 2020:

https://www.amny.com/news/new-book-written-by-former-new-yorker-explores-political-correctness-through-her-personal-experiences/


And this YouTube Interview, my first on This book. I learned a lot from it: no more pretend conversations that I am too polite to take head-on:  https://youtu.be/M3g06Q3ASHY


             About My First Book

Click here to buy at Amazon


I grew up at the first degree-granting HBCU (Historically Black College/University) in the United States--Lincoln University, in rural Pennsylvania—and across the railroad tracks in the poor community next door known as the Village, before desegregation. A community where Blacks and Whites lived together and socialized on an equal footing was virtually unheard-of during the 1940s and 1950s. But we were that place.

Lincoln was always different, and so were those of us who grew up there. Or were we? We were Black and White, light-skinned and dark-skinned, financially secure and extremely poor, highly educated and barely educated, the children of refugees and the great-grandchildren of slaves.

You will hear what we thought of each other, what we didn't know about each other, and what we thought we knew about each other but didn't know. We loved each other and hurt each other. You will hear many sides of the same issues, as well as things that were known only to the person speaking. It's all part of the human territory we will cover as together as we journey down through Lincoln's layers to the poorest of the poor and look at why we have always had a troubled relationship with human differences, the very fabric of our existence. 


Available in paperback and e-book at Amazon (link above) and by order from bookstores and libraries. 

See below video of the presentation on Different at Lincoln University.


The author and friend

Marita Rivero

Eddie Benard at his home

in the Lincoln Village

Contact Information

Corinna Fales Consulting

Phone: 919-537-8348 | Email: [email protected]


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